Nate McMaster

Software dev & infrequent blogger

Recent Posts

dotnet watch 2.1

It's now a built-in command and it works inside Docker.

.NET Core 2.1 RC1 was released this week. This is the first supported version of the .NET Core CLI which ships dotnet watch as a built-in command. In addition to changing how this tool ships, dotnet-watch 2.1 has a few improvements that make it the best version yet.

.NET Core 2.1 Global Tools

Getting started with creating a .NET Core global tool package. Also, a peek under the hood.

.NET Core 2.1 RC1 was released this week. This is the first supported version of the .NET Core CLI which includes a feature called “.NET Core Global Tools”. This feature provides a simple way to create and share cross-platform console tools. In this post, I’ll go over some of the basics, and then walk though what is going on under the hood. You will need to download .NET Core 2.1 to use this to try this on your own.

Deep-dive into .NET Core primitives: deps.json, runtimeconfig.json, and dll's

Examining the foundations of a .NET Core application

I learned to program with gcc, C++, and vim. When I started working with C# and .NET, clicking the “Start” button in Visual Studio was magical, but also dissatisfying. Dissatisfying – not because I want to write a Makefile – but because I didn’t know what “Start” did. So, I started to dig. In this post, I’ll show the most primitive tools used in .NET Core, and manually create a .NET Core app without the help of Visual Studio. If you’re new to .NET Core and want to peek under the hood, this is a good post for you. If you’re already a .NET Core developer and wonder what *.deps.json or *.runtimeconfig.json files are all about, I’ll cover those, too.

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